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State Officials Support Boost in Education and Awareness Efforts for Prostate Cancer

Senator Chandler Attends Release of New Data on Prostate Cancer Care in Massachusetts Hosted by AdMeTech Foundation

BOSTON, MA, April 3, 2014 – State Senator Harriet L. Chandler of Worcester joined other elected officials and community leaders today at a briefing unveiling a new analysis of the mortality, incidence, and quality of life in Massachusetts men facing prostate cancer and the related costs to state health care. This data highlights the critical need for increased awareness and education in order to improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. The presentation, led by AdMeTech Foundation President and CEO Dr. Faina Shtern, also outlined the emerging advances in cutting edge clinical knowledge and research that, if transferred to patients and standard care, would improve patient outcomes.

“Prostate cancer is the second most malignant type of cancer for men and is a public health priority,” said Senator Chandler.  “AdMeTech Foundation works hard to raise awareness and promote education of prostate cancer, which play key roles in prevention.  As a Co-Chair of the Legislature’s Prevention for Health Caucus, I truly believe that with proper diagnostic tools, treatment, and awareness, prostate cancer is curable when it is detected early.”

 The event was a part of an ongoing effort by state leaders and Dr. Shtern to create a Massachusetts model of national and international leadership in prostate cancer awareness and education. This effort follows the successful example of breast cancer education and awareness, which transformed breast cancer care.

According to the new analysis provided by AdMeTech, the incidence rate of prostate cancer is 19 percent higher and mortality rate is seven percent greater than that of breast cancer in Massachusetts . In the Caucasian population, the mortality rate of prostate cancer is over 30 percent higher than that of breast cancer. In the African American community, the mortality rate of prostate cancer is 295 percent greater than that of breast cancer. Yet, according to Dr. Shtern, men do not have accurate diagnostics tools akin to life-saving mammograms.

“Prostate cancer is curable when detected early, and we can save countless lives. I applaud these Massachusetts legislators for recognizing the need for a statewide commitment to education and awareness that will transform prostate cancer care,” said Dr. Shtern. “More conversations like we had today will generate sustainable public attention and grassroots mobilization of key health care stakeholders that will end prostate cancer as a patient care crisis and a socio-economic problem.”

“I am so pleased that we had this opportunity to discuss these findings with state and local leaders.  We are committed to continuing our work to better understand prostate cancer, create appropriate guidelines for screening and increase people’s awareness so they can consider what’s right for them with their health care provider,” said Department of Public Health Commissioner Cheryl Bartlett, RN, who attended the presentation and has advocated for prostate cancer education and awareness. 

About AdMeTech: AdMeTech Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization based in Boston, MA dedicated to ending the prostate cancer crisis. AdMeTech provides international leadership in ground-breaking programs in research, education and awareness in order to save lives, improve quality of life in millions of men, and reduce billions of dollars in health care costs. For more information, visit www.admetech.org.

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Prometheus April 04, 2014 at 07:57 AM
I told you the government wants to stick their noses everywhere.

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